For me, snacks are key to carb counting survival. In general, I feel satisfied after eating a carb-controlled meal but I’m finding myself hungry 2-3 hours after the meal. Snack time!

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Ideally, a carb-controlled snack for my plan would have 15-20 grams carbohydrate and some protein (even better if it adds in fiber too!). The carbohydrates keep my energy up while protein helps keep the carbohydrates from raising blood sugar too quickly. My struggle is I’m finding the protein portion tough for some reason. Some of my favorite example snacks include:

  • 6-8 whole grain crackers with cheese
  • ¼ cup unsalted nuts with 2 Tablespoons dried fruit
  • 1 small apple with 2 Tbsp peanut or almond butter
  • 3 cups popcorn with a drizzle of olive oil, dash of salt, and garlic powder, rosemary, and thyme (it’s delicious – and even though this one doesn’t have much protein, it’s a whole grain, it’s high in fiber, and the portion is no joke)

My challenge is that often snack time ends up being on my breaks at work, and proteins are either tough to pack or they need preparation and/or refrigeration. I did a stint with mozzarella cheese sticks and they worked out really well but I got a little bored with them. I haven’t been able to make it to Winco to get the bulk mixed nuts at a decent price (I refuse to pay the prices at most grocery stores), and I’ll be honest, I’ve been too lazy to get a little container to put peanut or almond butter in. I could hard boil a bunch of eggs to have ready and take with me, but here again – too lazy, too busy. Gah.

Many times this last week, my snack has ended up being 15-20 grams carb only, without the protein. That’s less than ideal because besides regulating blood sugar, protein helps a snack be more satisfying for longer.

As I gradually add in diabetes recommendations to follow, I have to say that there is a LOT to it. I hear that from my patients all the time, and they aren’t kidding. Remembering to pack a lunch is pretty much habit, but the snacks are often a last-minute afterthought and making sure there’s protein with them seems like a nice idea that only happens when the planets align just right.

Anyway, this is all good experience for me as an RD and it backs up what I hope I communicate to my patients: do the best you can, take one step at a time, and be prepared that life is going to push you back. Life happens. Life gets crazy. Motivation comes and goes. Just be steady and do your best. After all, your life is worth fighting for!


What do you think?